Great Irish Music

Gavin Glass is one of our faves and an all round sound guy. 

He came in to record for Paul recently. Have a listen to the podcast above.

Don't forget his album is out now.

The McLoone Sessions air Wednesdays 9 to Midnight. 

 

Opus Pocus. What the hell does that mean? Let’s break it down. Opus is Latin for work. Pocus speaks of conjuring, and magic. We’re talking about a work of magic, which is what the new long player from   Gavin Glass surely is. A deliberate step away from his folk-rock roots into more experimental, and interesting, territory, while retaining his old school song writing nous.

We’re a long way from Gavin’s last effort, 2015’s universally acclaimed Sunday Songs. The new record is twain in two: Side A is entitled ‘Opus Pocus, Side B is ‘Algorhythm & Blues’. Gavin used the term Opus Pocus in the studio (his office for the last ten years as one of Ireland’s most in-demand record producers) to describe the relentless, oft-times impossible, artistic striving towards perfection, towards creating that magic work.

“It’s something I’ve come to realise only recently, we put too much emphasis on crafting the perfect record, the perfect piece of art, second guessing ourselves and wallowing in self-doubt. In reality, the beauty is always in the cracks, the perfection is in the imperfection, music is this great healer and Opus Pocus is about learning to embrace that idea.”

The album is mixed in a way that bleeds each song into the next, using widescreen interludes designed to tempt the listener off the beaten track and in to the long grass.

“I wanted these interludes, the music in between the music, to represent the idea of technology, and how, despite its power to connect, it can leave us feeling alone and alienated. Judged, ranked and graded by our own volition.”

The lyrical content, the equal of Glass’s compositional and production skills, ranges from the enforced maturity brought on by parenthood to the realities of city life for Dublin’s Generation Xers as middle age encroaches, and the devastation wrought by a parent disappearing in to Alzheimer’s. If you’re after some ‘moon in June’ action, seek it elsewhere, although there are a few love songs thrown in, just in case.

The two singles – ‘Break Your Daddy’s Heart’ and ‘Thirty Somethings’ – have already picked up a deservedly hefty amount of airplay from the national broadcaster, both topping the Irish radio airplay charts.